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1) Get familiar with Python. Many (but certainly not all) web apps and web frameworks are written in python, which makes it very handy to know your way around the language. And if you don't already know python very well, or have a lot of programming experience, writing web apps are a great way to develop your skills and learn some awesome stuff! There are lots of great resources to help you get familiar with python, including (but not limited to):

So, you want to start a LUG? DO IT! Here are some hints that I've picked up in 2 years as President and 1 year as Vice President of the OSU LUG.

Resources

Your first task is to evaluate what already exists in your community, to determine whether a LUG is needed.

Current and former local LUGs and friends

Has your campus ever had a LUG? If so, find its web site and mailing list. Use the names, IRC handles, and your Facebook and LinkedIn stalking skills to track down the LUG's former leaders and reach out to them to see whether they'd be willing to advise and mentor you in resurrecting their old group.

Other people who might know about old LUGs include CS faculty, academic advisors (if they've worked at the university for longer than you've been there), and the full-time network services staff who run mailing lists and student organization web hosting.

Alumni

If you ...more

Technical Resume Hints

Technical Resume Advice

The advice you'll get at a place like OSU Career Services is appropriate for generic resumes, but not all of it applies when tailoring your resume for a technical role. Technical resumes will typically be read by automated systems, HR people, and the professional engineers who conduct your interview.

Know Your Audience

Once you get your resume into the hands of an interviewer or hiring manager, it needs to accurately reflect who you are and what you can do. Don't lie, and don't bullshit. Sure, claiming to be proficient in technologies you don't know might get you an interview, but that interview will ask questions that you can't answer and generally waste everyone's time.

Conversely, don't underestimate your own abilities. If there's a project that you've done which you're reluctant to include on your resume because it ...more

Event Publicity

The Event Publicity Cheat Sheet

LUG runs or contributes to a variety of events, from Installfests to BarCamps to regular outreach activities. This guide will be a work in progress -- please update it with what you learn as you try to implement its suggestions.

A month before the event:

  • Talk to whoever runs the mailing lists for the departments you're recruiting from, to make them aware of your event and get permission to post to their mailing lists closer to the time it's happening. For EECS, talk to Calvin.

  • Contact that Daily Barometer and KBVR (the campus radio station) to find out whether they can run ads for or articles about the event. Get permission to stick posters on Barometer kiosks.

  • Design flyers (8.5x11") for posting around campus, and signs or banners to put outside the building on the day of the event. Get the signs or banners ...more

Running an InstallFest

0) 1-2 weeks Before Term Starts

Pick a time and date for the InstallFest. The usual LUG time (Tuesday at 6pm) generally works, and we usually have a room for it as well. Contact Tina Batten from EECS to reserve KEC1005 or KEC1007. Week 2 or 3 is generally a good time to have InstallFest, since students in the introductory CS classes have realized they need Linux but haven't gotten it yet.

  • Take inventory of the USB sticks available. If there are less than about 20 install disks available, get a bunch of cheap 1-2GB ones online if you'd like to hand them out to participants. Print stickers with the LUG's logo and url, and label the giveaway sticks before handing them out.

Alternately, if the USB sticks available are 4GB or larger, make them able to install multiple distros using ...more